Content Curation

http://www.splicedtogether.net/001/

splicedtogether is an online magazine that consists of the pages on the righthand side of this page – http://www.splicedtogether.net/001/. They are about “Taking Names”

You must come up with the planning of a way to organise these pages into a presentable online magazine site.

There are three main components for this assessment: a mock-up of the splicedtogether entry page, a site design for splicedtogether, and a brief argument in favour of your curatorial choices.

The first component is a mock-up of the entry page for splicedtogether. You do not have to actually create this page. This is the entry point for splicedtogether: it needs to engage the audience and encourage them to keep reading. You therefore need to think carefully about the design and about how you will introduce readers to the content. You may, for example, choose to provide an overview of all pages, or you may choose to display links to only a few featured pages. At this stage, we have left the design largely up to you: the only elements that you must include are a link to at least one page, the issue title, and an editorial introduction (300 to 500 words).

The second component is a site design for splicedtogether. There will be many pages of content: your challenge is to work out how you will create connections between these pages. You may choose to group pages by theme and to provide a menu structure that reflects this grouping on the entry page. You may choose, instead, to follow a more traditional magazine layout and present pages in a sequential order, linking to only the first page on the entry page. You may end up choosing some combination of these options, or another site design entirely: the only limitations are that every page must link to at least one other page. You must bear in mind the affordances of the online environment in thinking about how to link pages to each other. Remember, also, that this is an authorial act. In choosing how the audience will move between pages on the site, you are helping to shape the narrative flow and meaning of splicedtogether.

The third component is an argument (600 words maximum) in favour of your curatorial choices. You need to explain to the splicedtogether publisher how your entry page and site design will engage the audience, and any other relevant aspects of your design choices. In order to be effective, your argument must draw on relevant academic literature.

Garrett, Jesse James (2002). Visual Vocabulary for Information Architecture. JJG.net. Retrieved from http://www.jjg.net/ia/visvocab/.
Your plan for splicedtogether requires that you create a complex set of relationships between different pages: you will need to think about how you will map out and present these relationships visually in a clear and accessible way. Garrett’s visual vocabulary is a commonly-used tool for representing site designs and while you do not have to use the symbols that Garrett lays out here, at the very least they will give you an idea of how site design can be presented.

McNely, B. (2010). Exploring a sustainable and public information ecology. Proceedings of the 28th ACM International Conference on Design of Communication. doi: 10.1145/1878450.1878468
Creating a vibrant and sustainable community around a single event (a conference, in this case) requires a combination of top-down measures and bottom-up community participation. In previous units you may have already discussed ways of encouraging participation and engagement with online content through social media, and previously in the unit we talked about encouraging engagement on the page level. We now encourage you to think about audience engagement on a more fundamental level: how can you design sites, rather than single pages, that invite participation and encourage the formation of community?

Here are some sources that may help:

Garrett, Jesse James (2002). Visual Vocabulary for Information Architecture. JJG.net. Retrieved from http://www.jjg.net/ia/visvocab/.
Your plan for splicedtogether requires that you create a complex set of relationships between different pages: you will need to think about how you will map out and present these relationships visually in a clear and accessible way. Garrett’s visual vocabulary is a commonly-used tool for representing site designs and while you do not have to use the symbols that Garrett lays out here, at the very least they will give you an idea of how site design can be presented.

Simon, N. (2010). Chapter 1: Principles of Participation. The Participatory Museum. Santa Cruz: Museum 2.0. Retrieved from http://www.participatorymuseum.org/chapter1/.
Simon argues that participatory platforms need to open spaces for audiences to add their own content, as well as engage with the content provided in unusual and interesting ways. Although Simon focuses on the physical location of the museum, the principles laid out in this chapter are also applicable to the online environment. As you read this, use Simon’s work to guide your thinking on different ways in which you might want your audience to engage with splicedtogether, and how you can use the site design as a ‘scaffolding’ to facilitate this engagement. Simon talks about the importance of recognising that museums have ‘institutional goals’, as well as wanting to meet the needs of their audiences; what are the ‘institutional goals’ of splicedtogether?

Tang, J. (2006). The Big Bang at Centre Georges Pompidou. Theory, Culture & Society, 23(7-8), 243-252. doi: 10.1177/0263276406073227 Retrieved from http://tcs.sagepub.com/content/23/7-8/243.abstract
Tang uses the iconic and controversial Big Bang exhibition to explore the merits of thematic curation. You don’t need to follow all of the details about the artwork here: instead, think about the kinds of connections and juxtapositions that are being discussed and the ways in which they might be applied to online curation.

Toms, Elaine G. (2002). Information interaction: Providing a framework for information architecture. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 53(10), 855-862. Retrieved from https://www.unc.edu/~acrystal/110-117/toms.pdf.
Information architecture plays a key role in structuring the way the audience engages with online material. Toms argues that users may not always have an explicit goal in interacting with a body of information and discusses some potential responses: this is particularly useful advice in when it comes to a site like splicedtogether. As you read this, you may want to begin asking yourself: do you think that the notion of ‘information tasks’ is helpful in thinking about how the splicedtogether audience will interact with the site? If not, does Toms’ work suggest any other ways in which you might you think about your audience’s engagement with the site?

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more
Uncategorized